WHO confirmation on Air Pollution and current status quo

The World Health Organization (WHO) released data showing that nine out of ten people are breathing air containing dangerous levels of pollutants.

The results of the data corroborate with another study by the organization which was released in April. Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of WHO, air pollution threatens everyone, but those who are affected the most are the poorest and marginalized.

The new figures arose as residents of Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia drink “oxygen cocktails” to prevent the harmful effects of air pollution from affecting their bodies.

Ulaanbaatar is ranked by UNICEF as the most polluted capital city in the world and is tagged by WHO as one of the Asian and African cities susceptible to the toxic effects of air pollution.

Dr. Maria Neira, the leader of public health efforts at WHO, however, reported that some of the world’s megacities such as Beijing, Delhi, and Jakarta exceed guideline levels for air quality by more than five times.

Since 2016, more than a thousand new cities have been added to the organization’s database. There are a total of 4300 towns currently listed in the database.

The measures employed by WHO focus on concentrations of fine particulate matter which are the cause of diseases like stroke, heart disease, and lung cancer.

Dr. Tedros said that they are seeing more governments increasing commitments to monitor and reduce air pollution as well as global action from the health sector and others.

Around three billion people still do not have access to cleaner fuels and technology to use in their homes which causes a risk that affects women and children primarily.

WHO also emphasized the need to clean up household air pollution in the developing world as well as more extensive efforts to implement a cleaner transport and energy system.